The Colour Pink

…the sweet, compassionate side of red. While red, and hot pink, perceives Love as passionate and hot, toning it down with the purity and good intent of white makes it romantic and charming, speaking of unconditional Love and Friendship.

Through French influence, Pink is forever associated with the fancies of Madame Pompadour, Strawberry Satin and shell striped Brocades. Pink is in Venus (the Roman goddess of Love, usually depicted in nurturing pink tints) and Flamingos, Pastries and Candy Floss, the Pink Panther, the pink Ladies (with the pink Cadillacs)..

Pink is gentle and delicate and has a soothing effect on one’s behavior. However, large amounts of pink tend to create physical weakness in people. No wonder it makes us crave sugar! No matter how weak pink might seem to some, it has a hidden power, it sells millions of products aimed at the feminine buyer, and is adored by little girls worldwide.. whether we like it or not!

Earlier pinks were simply dilutions of various reds, derived from cinnabar, vermilion and carmine, as well as earth and rust.

Did you Know?
Masses of the old houses in Suffolk, are pink and have been for centuries. Originally it was whitewash mixed with bull’s blood to give it a thicker consistency and make it last longer.

Hot or shocking Pink, or magenta as we know it began in 1859, when a new pigment was isolated from coal-tar. It came to be called magenta after the battle of Magenta, because the colour of blood on the French soldiers’ blue tunics created a similar colour to what was known as Fuchsine, after the colour of Fuchsias. The new colour had never been seen before. It had never been seen in painting or in decoration. It was sizzlingly new. In the 1890s, magenta became one of the three primary pigments of printer’s ink, and in our own time it is the fuchsia or electronic magenta of computer displays.

The secret of pink lies in the careful combination of different shades to balance often ‘weak’ associations with the high energy and hot vibrant feelings associated with a passionate red influence. Brighter Pinks are youthful, fun and exciting, while softer pinks are associated with romance and the blush of a women’s cheeks. All shades of Pink become sophisticated when combined with black, or gray, or medium to darker shades of blue. Add strength to lighter shades of Pink by combining it with darker shades of purple, burgundy or Brown for a classic setting.